What's Happening at FHPS

Entries for January 2015

25

 In order to help students develop into digital literates, they must understand to basics of online search. Google Search has a number of features that make finding the right information quick and easy. Here are a few things to know about Google Search: 

  • When using the Chrome browser on a computer, tablet, or mobile device, you can use the omnibox (address bar) to search using Google
  • Typing in keywords can start you off on a search but using search operators can helpyou search more efficiently
  • Filters can help narrow down your search; they appear below the Google.com search bar when you view your results
  • Enable voice search in the Chrome browser to speak the “Ok Google” phrase to begin a search
  • Specific Google databases can provide better search results – try Google Scholar to search scholarly literature or Google News to search the headlines


Learning to use Google Search effectively is a process. Here are some ideas for starting out using the basics of Google Search: 

  • Start with a simple search for information using one or two words, for example, “Sao Paolo”
  • Add a location to a search for a thing; “New York City parks”
  • Understand what is relevant in your search terms
  • Spelling: Google's spell checker automatically uses the most common spelling of a given word
  • Capitalization: A search for “New York Times” is the same as a search for “new york times”
  • Punctuation: Most punctuation (?!,.%^*()[]\) is ignored when you search
  • Common words: “a” and “the” are usually ignored unless they are included in quotations as part of a phrase.

 

Take a look at this video to learn more about how to select the keywords necessary to perform a successful Google search:

 

"Google for Education: Google Search: Basics." Google for Education: Google Search: Basics. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Jan. 2015.

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Google search, information literacy, keywords, web
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10

The data and information that you leave behind on webpages and on social media services such as YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, or Facebook makes up your digital footprint. You should know that the information you provide may be stored with or without your knowledge  - intentionally or unintentionally.

Once a video, photo, or message is uploaded to a website or social network, or sent to a mobile device, it can be nearly impossible to retrieve or delete. With this shared information, other people can duplicate it, share it without permission or take a picture or screenshot of it, so even if the owner deletes it, it may not be gone completely. 

Learning to manage your digital footprint is a critical skill to have today and includes how to search for information about yourself and how to share information responsibly. To learn more about managing your online reputation, check out Google's Support Center.

Watch the following video created for A Platform for Good (a fosi.org project) to hear teen perspectives on the importance of digital reputation.

"Google for Education: Google Digital Citizenship: Introduction." Google for Education: Google Digital Citizenship: Introduction. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2015.

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